July 14, 2022

How To Tie a Palomar Fishing Knot

Scott Kimball

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Scott Kimball

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If you are a beginner at fishing knots, a Palomar knot might be the best knot to try. Is it easy to learn how to tie a Palomar fishing knot?

Since there are a huge number of fishing knots, you don't need to learn many of them. You can start with very few knots and then gradually learn more as you go.

To tie a Palomar knot, you first double up your line and then pass it through the eye. Then, you make a simple loop knot with the doubled-up end of your line. Finally, you put the end of the hook through the doubled-up end and tighten the knot.

There's a bit more to it than that because you can weaken the line if you do it wrong. You should get the monofilament line wet before you tie the knot. With fluorocarbon, you need a lubricant.

I have been fishing since I was a kid, and the first knots I learned were the Palomar knot (to attach the hook) and the blood knot (to join two lines together). There probably isn't a better beginner's knot than the Palomar.

How To Tie a Palomar Fishing Knot | Today I'm Outside

Table of Contents:

How Do You Tie a Palomar Knot?

Step 1: First, double up your line and pass it through the eye of your fishing hook. You will use the hoop that the doubled-up line forms to tie your knot. Leave about 6 inches of line on either side, or else you won't have enough to tie a knot.

Step 2: Next, make a simple overhand loop-knot with the doubled up line. You should not tighten the knot yet. Make sure not to kink the line at any point, as this can weaken it and make it break later.

Step 3: Now, pass the doubled-up end of the line over the hook, so that it goes between the two lines.

Step 4: Now, wet the fishing line and pull the knot tight. That is enough to complete the knot. If you use strong monofilament line; it may be enough to hold 30 pounds, which is more than enough to catch most large fish.

What Will Make a Palomar Knot Fail to Work?

A Palomar knot may fail if:

  • You kink the line
  • You cross the lines
  • You don't use lubricant with a Fluorocarbon line

A lot of the time, you can get a Palomar knot right the first time you try. However, even an experienced angler might tie a bad fishing knot sometimes. You can easily make a small mistake and lose your hook/lure if you aren't paying attention.

Is a Uni Knot Stronger Than a Palomar Knot?

Yes, a Uni Knot stronger. However, a Palomar knot is a great beginner's knot. It is reasonably strong while being easy to tie. As you learn other knots, you may stop using the Palomar, but it is also quicker, so you might not abandon it entirely.

How Strong is a Palomar Knot?

With monofilament line it can hold about 30 pounds. With braided line, it will only hold about half of that.

If you are using heavy pound-test line, you may need it to hold more than 15 or 30 pounds. In that case, you will need to learn other knots.

Does a Palomar Knot Work With Fluorocarbon Line?

Yes, but only if you are using fishing line lubricant. If you are not using lubricant at all, friction will overheat the fluorocarbon line and make the knot fail.

Having your knot fail will make you lose your lure and hook. Tie your knots carefully to avoid this. You should also check your fishing line for signs of damage and replace it before it breaks.

Common Fishing Knots

There are dozens and even hundreds of fishing knots you could learn. Not many people even know a tenth of them. Some knots are much more common than others.

Different knots are good for different situations. While you don't need to know a lot of knots, you should know more than one or two of them. You will encounter situations where a less common knot is the most useful.

Blood Knot

The blood knot is not for attaching a line to a fishing hook. Instead, it is for attaching two lines together. If you use a very crude and simple knot to do this, it may come undone as soon as there is any real pull on the line.

Usually, anglers tie a blood knot to repair broken line. Thankfully, blood knots are easy for beginners to learn.

Clinch Knot

The clinch knot and especially the improved clinch knot are great when you are pulling in heavy fish. It has really a lot of durability and strength when you attach it to a hook.

Hangman's Knot

This is a great, multi-purpose knot that works in many situations. Knowing more than one or two knots is useful, but if you only want to learn two, go with the Palomar knot and the hangman's knot.

Uni Knot

The uni knot is another multi-purpose knot that you will find very useful after you learn it. You can use it to attach lures or attach two pieces of line together. It works well for fluorocarbon as well as monofilament lines.

Spider Hitch Knot

The spider hitch knot is also great if you need more strength than normal. The spider hitch knot lets you make a double line and wrap it around the hook, making the line twice as hard to break.

This won't truly make your line twice as strong. If you try to pull in a big fish that is too strong for your line, it will snap elsewhere. However, the spider hitch knot is still one of the strongest knots.

Why Are Fishing Knots Important?

Anyone who goes fishing needs to know how to tie fishing knots. You need to tie the knots properly, or else your line will slip off.

Is It Hard to Tie Fishing Knots?

No, you can learn most of them easily. Some of them are a bit trickier, but anyone can get good at tying fishing knots.

What Are the Easiest Fishing Knots?

The Palomar knot is usually the best choice if you want an easy but still reasonably strong knot. Other people recommend the Rapala knot, surgeon's knot, and hangman's knot for beginners.

What Are the Hardest Fishing Knots?

If you are looking for a challenge, you could try the FG knot. The FG knot is complicated but may be the best knot if you want to tie a monofilament line to a fluorocarbon leader.

What Types of Line Are Easiest to Tie Knots With?

Monofilament line and copolymer line are good for tying knots. Braided line is harder to tie knots with. This is one of the many things that prevent stronger braided line from replacing monofilament.

How To Tie a Palomar Fishing Knot

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About THE AUTHOR

Scott Kimball

From a young age I was introduced to fishing, hiking, camping, snowboarding and more through family, friends, and scouting. After 20 years of learning and participating in these outdoor activities, I share what i've learned (and continue learning) with you.

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